Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

George Frideric Handel

Thursday, June 30, 2016


Classical iconoclast

June 23

Vaughan Williams Weekend St John's Smith Square

Classical iconoclastRalph Vaughan Williams and Friends Weekend at St John's Smith Square, a glorious three-day celebration of British music. This follows on the success of previous SJSS weekends devoted to Schubert and Schumann.  Curated by Anna Tilbrook, the RVW/SJSS weekend features The Holst Singers, James Gilchrist, Philip Dukes, and Ensemble Elata. The Weekend runs from 7th to 9th October, but get tickets soon as they will sell fast. There's no clash with the Oxford Lieder Festival which starts the following weekend, this year featuring Schumann. Friday 7th at 7.30 : The Holst Singers conducted by Benjamin Nicholas launch the festival on Friday evening: Parry I was Glad, Stanford Beatoi quorum via, W Lloyd Weber, Howells Requiem, Holst Nunc Dimittis, and RVW's Lord thou hast been our refuge Saturday 8th at 1 pm :  RVW Songs of Travel, Elgar Salut d'amour, Frank Bridge Oh, that it were so, Rebecca Clarke Passacaglia, Quilter : Go, lovely Rose, Bantock Hebrew Melody, Ivor Gurney Ludlow and Teme Saturday 8th 4 pm : The Folk Connection  Quilter I will go with my father a-ploughing, Percy Grainger : Molly on the Shoree, RVW : Along the Field, Six Studies in English Folk Song, Winter's Willow and Linden lea, Rebecca Clarke : I'll bid my heart be still, Grainger: Handel in the Strand. Saturday 8th at 7.30 : The Spiritual Realm  RVW : Rhosymedre, Four Hymns, Orpheus with his lute, Sky above the roof, Silent Noon, Piano Quintet, Finzi : Til the Earth Outwears, Elgar : Chanson de matin, Chanson de nuit (photo above Finzi and RVW, courtesy Finzi Trust) Sunday 9th at 11.30 : The Shadow of War : Bliss Elegaic Sonnet, Ireland The Darkened valley, Butterworth : Six Songs from A Shropshire Lad, Elgar : Piano Quintet Sunday 9th at 3 pm : The Shadow of War II : Ireland ;The Soldier, Blow out, you bugles, Spring Sorrow, Elgar : Sospiri, Gurney: Severn Meadows, Lights Out, Sleep, In Flanders, By a Bierside, Howells : Elegy, RVW : On Wenlock Edge

Classical iconoclast

Yesterday

English Baroque Opera, St John's Smith Square

English Baroque opera at St Jiohn's , Smith Square, ready for booking now.  The English baroque style is unique, more "classical" than mor exuberant, southern forms, yet connected to contemporary theatrical values.  St John's, Smith Square is a gem of British baroque architecture, an ideal place in which to enjoy English baroque music. Bampton Classical Opera starts the new season with "Diviner Comedies"| on 13/9, pairing Thomas Arne's The Judgement of Paris,  "a  witty account of a celestial beauty contest"  with "the supremely lyrical  Gluck Philemon and Baucis, continuing  Bampton's, enterprising exploration of Gluck's lesser known operas. Paul Wingfield will conduct CHROMA Henry Purcell Dido and Aeneas on 29/9 with the celebrated La Nuova Musica, led by David Peter Bates. Major headliners - Dame Ann Murray will sing Dido and George Humphreys will sing Aneas.  Again, a very good cast. What's more, with typical adventurous La Nuova Musica flair,  this performance will be illustrated with dancers, choreographed by Zack Winokur. This should be one of the highlights of the season - book early ! Thomas Linley's Lyric Ode: on the Fairies, Aerial Beings and Witches of Shakespeare  features in Bampton Classical Opera's second concert on 15/11. A glorious piuece,, vivisly dramatic.  It's being paired with excerpts from Georg Benda's Singspeil Romeo and Juliet,which Bampton Opera did in 2007.  Gilly French conducts the Bampton Classical Players and  cast that includes Rosemary Coad, Caroline kennedy, Thomas Hereford and James Harrison. Anothernhighlight ! The Early Opera Company, conducted by Christopher Curnyn malkes a werlcome return to St Jihns Smith Square on 18/11 with Handel's Serse HWV40 , this time with Anna Stépany, Rupert Enticknap, Callum Thorpe and Claire booth, among others. Lots more, too. La Nuova Musica is doing Bach Mozart and Haydn in December.  And don't foirget the famus SJSS Christmas season, which sells out fast because it's so much fun. For more details visit the SJSS . website HERE>




Classical iconoclast

June 23

James Gilchrist Sally Beamish premiere Wigmore Hall

James Gilchrist and Anna Tilbrook at the Wigmore Hall, London with  Sally Beamish's West Wind.  Gilchrist has been one of the most determined advocates of English song, almost from the beginning of his career.  Although his core repertoire is built on solid foundations of Handel, Purcell, RVW, Britten, and especially Gerald Finzi of whom he is a great exponent, Gilchrist has always made a point of promoting composers who should be more in the mainstream, like Hugh Wood, Lennox Berkeley and John Jeffreys and others whom he's performed live but not recorded. .  By commissioning Beamish, one of the most prominent British composers for voice, Gilchrist is again making a valuable contribution to British music.  Beamish's West Wind is based on Percy Bysshe Shelley's Ode to the West Wind, which everyone knows as a poem, but which has hardly ever been set to music, at least not in full.  English poets dominate world literature - Shakespeare, the Restoration poets, Wordsworth, Keats - but this heritage is hardly reflected in music. History might explain things. The Industrial Revolution transformed British society, making it more urban and centralized than was the case elsewhere in Europe.  British and European Romanticism were very different, in ways too complex to describe here.  Furthermore,  the British choral tradition was so strong that other forms of music making didn't get much attention.  Perhaps the very nature of English Romantic poetry is relevant.  The style is fulsome and elegaic, lending itself to oratorio rather than to art song. It's significant that Hubert Parry was one of the first to create art song from English poetry.  Read here about the ground breaking series of Parry's songs to English texts from Somm Records  (Gilchrist, Roderick Williams and Susan Gritton.) Rolling, circular figures introduce Beamish's West Wind the voice entering from a distance as if it were being blown in by the "pestilence stricken multitudes".  Soon, though, the voice asserts itself.,  Gilchrist dings the words "Cold and low.....the corpse within its grave". A slow, penetrating chill descends, but, like the wind, the music changes direction, at turns capricious, rhen still, then rushing forth.  The third section is particularly beautiful. Delicate piano figures lead into curling, keening vocal phrases that seem to hover in the air, "Lull'd by the coil of his crystalline streams".   In the lower register of the piano, perhaps we can detect sonorous "lungs" . Suddenly lightness returns. "If I were a dead leaf", Gilchrist sings, almost unaccompanied, suggesting fragility.  His touch is delicate, yet perfectly poised. The phrasing suits his voice. Gilchrist has the strange esoteric timbre of a typical English tenor, but also direct, almost conversational  naturalness.  From vulnerable sensitivity to the ferocity of the last poem. "Make me thy lyre" Gilchrist growls at the bottom of his timbre. Now Tilbrook's playing flutters weightlessly, like falling leaves.  "Scatter, scatter, scatter" Gilchrist sings, each word on a slightly different level.  "O.. O...O " he sang, mimicking the sound of wind, the word "Wind" pitched and held  so high that it floated, rarified, into air.  Beamish's West Wind is quirky, underlining the disturbing undercurrents in a poem ostensibly about Nature, but too malign to be a "nature poem". I kept thinking of  Peter Warlock's The Curlew, another cycle well suited to Gilchrist's style.  I also remembered Gilchrist's  Die Schöne Müllerin. There are hundreds of recordings, but his stood out out from the competition because it was an interpretation derived as if from clinical observation of the miller's psychology.  In this Wigmore Hall recital, Gilchrist and Tilbrook included songs by Mendelssohn,and Liszt and Schumann's Liederkreis op 39. Eichendorff's poems are less overtly ironic than Heine's, which formed the basis of Schumann's Leiderkreis Op 24.  but are perhaps closer to,the spirit of the very early Romantic period. After hearing this performance, I've decided to grt Gilchrist's recent recording of the Schumann song cycles on Linn. photo credit operomnia.uk/Hazard Chase Management



Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

June 21

‘He never once said a disapproving word to a student’

Michael Garady, life companion of Peter Feuchtwanger who died at the weekend , has asked us to publish his personal tribute, adjoined by Leonard Bergaman who was one of Peter’s last students. in persönlicher Nachruf auf Peter Feuchtwanger. Es gibt Menschen, die sind so lange präsent und durchdringen mit ihrem Wirken derartig viel, dass es schwer vorstellbar erscheint, dass sie eines Tages nicht mehr unter uns weilen. Bei dem im letzten Jahr verstorbenen Altbundeskanzler Helmut Schmidt war das der Fall, doch abseits der Welt der Politik gibt es Menschen , die auf ganz sanfte uneigennützige Weise die Welt zu einem besseren Ort werden lassen. Nun ist am 18.6. um Mitternacht der große Musiker und Mensch Peter Feuchtwanger gestorben. Generationen von Musikern und Scharen von Schülern verdanken ihm unendlich viel. Führt man sich die lange Liste derer vor Augen, die von ihm beeinflusst und geprägt worden sind, tauchen da Namen wie Martha Argerich, Dinorah Varsi, Youra Gouller , David Helfgott und Shura Cherkassy, um nur einige zu nennen. Doch als wäre das nicht schon staunenswert genug, sollte nicht unerwähnt bleiben, dass sich Peter Feuchtwangers segensreiches Wirken auch auf die weniger Bekannten und Begünstigten, ja mitunter weniger Begabten richtete. Und er behandelte sie alle gleich, egal ob feste Größen in der Musikwelt oder Anfänger, die keinen “Namen” haben. Es war ihm ein Anliegen, das Beste in allen seiner Schüler ans Licht zu bringen. Mit meistens wenigen Worten und sparsamen Hinweise schaffte er viel mehr als die meisten um viele Worte bemühten Klavierpädagogen. Schon seine bloße Anwesenheit und Aura hatten eine angstlösende und befreiende Wirkung. Schüler, die das erste Mal zu ihm kamen und seine Präsenz erlebten, waren verblüfft, dass eine derartige Koryphäe wie Professor Peter Feuchtwanger nicht die geringste Spur eines Egos zeigte oder gar die strenge Präsenz eines Lehrers, der seinen Schülern um jeden Preis einen Stempel aufdrücken möchte. Pädagogische Tyrannei stand ihm fern, er hatte sie schlicht nicht nötig. Vielelicht werden diese in der rauen Musikwelt raren Qualitäten, -gerade in der höchsten Liga-verständlicher , führt man sich Peter Feuchtwangers Werdegang näher vor Augen: Als Sohn eines Münchner Bankdirektors in ebenjener Stadt geboren (irgendwann in den 1930er Jahren), lernte er durch das Schicksal der Emigration schon früh das Leben von einer seiner härtesten und heikelsten Seiten kennen. Doch trotzdem hasste er nie. Er hasste nicht die Menschen, die ihm die Heimat genommen hatten, hasste nicht die Menschen, die ihn entwurzelt und seine Familie demütigen wollten und ihr nach dem Leben trachteten. Er erkannte, dass diese niedere menschliche Regung nie eine Lösung für ein Problem irgendeiner Art sein kann, sondern alles nur noch schlimmer macht . So blieb er sanft und beschloss, den Menschen zu helfen, bessere Musiker und Menschen zu werden. Und das ganz frei von allem Messianischen oder Egozentrischen. Als Kind und Jugendlicher war Peter Feuchtwanger eine phämonenale musikalische Begabung, die Ihresgleichen suchte. Entwurzelt in Palästina, begann er autodidaktisch mit dem Klavierspiel und lernte, indem er ein Gros der Klavierliteratur von einem Schallplattenspieler einen Halbton zu hoch nachspielte. Auf diese Weise entwickelte er eine einzigartige natürliche Technik des Klavierspiels, aus der er später seine weltbekannte didaktische Methode entwickeln konnte, die vielen Pianisten mit verkrampfter und ungesunder Spielweise von Sehnenscheidenentzündungen, Tennisarmen oder anderen Malaisen zu befreien vermochten und ihnen eine weitere Ausübung ihres Berufs wieder ermöglichten. Einige sehr bekannte Pianisten konsultierten ihn im Vertrauen, humorvoll pflegte er dazu zu sagen: “Das sind meine Geheimschüler.” Sehr schwer zu begreifen ist, dass Peter Feuchtwanger bis zu seinem dreizehnten Lebensjahr keine Noten lesen konnte. “Ertappt” wurde er von einem Lehrer zurück in Deutschland, als er die sogenannte “Mondscheinsonate” wie für ihn gewohnt in d-moll wiedergab , statt an dem für das Stück unerlässlichen , charakteristisch- düsteren und glutvollen cis- moll. Daraufhin begann die systematische Asubildung nach einem wirklich unorthodoxen Anfang. Seine geniale Begabung wurde in der Schweiz erkannt und gefördert, prägend waren die Zusammenarbeit mit Klavierlegende Edwin Fischer (ebenso Lehrer von Alfred Brendel) , Walter Gieseking, dem phänomenalen Interpret französisch- impressionister Musik, sowie nach eigenem Bekunden wohl der wichtigste Einfluss: die große und unvergessliche Pianistin Clara Haskil. Noch im vergangenen Jahr, während einer Taxifahrt im herbstlichen London schwärmte er von der Pianistin: “Clara Haskil war das größte Erlebnis in meinem Leben und daran hat sich fünfundfünzig Jahrenach ihrem Tod nichts geändert. Die beiden verband eine sehr natürliche Handhabung des pianistischen Spiel-Apparats und eine zunächst autodidaktische Herangehensweise. Charlie Chaplin meinte einmal, in seinem Leben wäre er nur drei Genies begegnet: Churchill, Einstein und Clara Haskil. Immer wieder sprach Peter Feuchtwanger mit Begeisterung von den Interpretationen der mittleren a- moll – Sonate D 845 von Franz Schubert oder der mittleren Beethoven- Sonate op. 31/3 in Es -Dur. Doch nicht vergessen darf man, wie wichtig die fast vergessene Tradition des Belcanto und Kunst des “Singens auf dem Klavier” für ihn waren. Wer einmal mit ihm an Chopin arbeiten konnte, wird es als Offenbarung im Gedächtnis behalten bis zum letzten Atemzug. Wohl beeinflusst durch sein Aufwachsen im Nahen Osten, zeigte Feuchtwanger schon früh ein ebenfalls großes Interesse und Begeisterung für die arabische und auch die indische Musik. Da er über eine ausgeprägte schöpferische Ader besaß, drängte es ihn schon bald zur Komposition. Den Kontrapunkt Palestrinas studierte er ebenso gründlich wie die komplizierte Rhythmik und den Stil der indischen Raga- Musik. Faszinierende Produkte dieser Auseinandersetzung sind die unvergleichlichen Klavierwerkde “Studies in Eastern Idiom” und die sehr schweren “Variations in an Eastern Idiom” von 1957. Mit diesem Wurd gewann er im gleichen jahr den Viotti- Kompositionswettbewerb, woraufhin Yehudi Menuhin auf ihn aufmerksam wurde und ein Werk für Ravi Shankar und ihn im Rahmen des “Bath Festivals” 1966 in Auftrag gab. Die besagte Kompostion wurde ein enormer Erfolg den man immer noch auf der Platte/CD “East meets West” nachhören kann. Leider fehlt dort aus unerfindlichen Gründen jeglicher Hinweis auf den Verfasser der “Raga Tilang”. Weitere Kompositionen folgten bis in die 1990er Jahre und bisher befindet sich nur ein kleiner Bruchteil verlegt im Handel. Martha Argerich äußerte sich schon früh enthusiastisch über Peter Feuchtwangers Oeuvre: “Peter Feuchtwangers Klaviermusik hat mich sehr beeindruckt aufgrund ihrer Tiefe, großen Frische und Originalität. Dies sind Qualität, die heutzutage sehr selten sind. Pianistisch gesehen sind seine Kompositionen höchst raffiniert und äußerst lohnend. Jeder Konzertpianist sollte sie in sein Repertoire aufnehmen. Dies wird verständlich, wenn man in Betracht zieht, daß Peter Feuchtwanger selbst ein wunderbarer und in jeder Beziehung außergewöhnlicher Pianist ist. ” Der junge Peter Feuchtwanger absolvierte eine glanzvolle Karriere als Pianist. Doch uns schwer wollte er sich in den erbarmungslosen Konzertbetrieb einfügen, der schon damals an die Substanz eines jeden sensiblen Menschen ging. Da er über ein außergewöhnliches, ja beängstigend gutes Gedächtnis verfügte, sei er von Agenten oft ausgenutzt worden. Das berichtete er mir vor einiger Zeit um dann verschmitzt lächelnd hinzuzufügen: “Edwin Fischer kam in die Festival- Hall und sollte op. 109 von Beethoven spielen. Dann meinte der Agent, sie spielen ja das gleiche, morgen werden sie op. 110 spielen oder gar nicht. Dann übte ich vierzehn Stunden am Vortag und als das Konzert begann, brach mir der Schweiß aus. zwar kam ich gut bis zur komplexen Fuge, dort aber musste ich schweißüberströmt tricksen. Der Kritiker schrieb danach, die Fuge sei der Höhepunkt des Konzerts gewesen”. Die rauhe Luft im Konzertbetrieb hat nicht nur ihn schon früh abgestoßen, sondern auch Kollegen wie Friedrich Gulda, Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli oder Andrej Gavrilov. So entschloss er sich, seine Laufbahn als Konzertpianist trotz großen Erfolges einzustellen und sich ganz dem Unterrichten und Komponieren zu verschreieben. Und er schien glücklich damit, selbst wenn er oft seine Trauer über den Zustand der Welt und seinen Unmut mit dem oft absurd fordernden und grausamen Musikbetrieb zum Ausdruck brachte. Niemals konnte er sich in das Korsett einer Musikschule begeben. Zwar war er Gastprofessor unter anderem ein Salzburg, jedoch zog er es vor, weltweit seine eigenen, unnachahmlichen Meisterkurse zu geben. Es herrschte immer eine äußerst familiäre ja liebevolle Atmosphäre und Peter Feuchtwanger schien stets im Nu die Eigenheiten und auch Probleme eines jeden Schülers mitfühllend- intuitiv erfasst zu haben, was bisweilen an Magie grenzte. Unzähligen Musikern mit schweren Lebensschicksalen wusste er zu helfen, an prominenstester Stelle dem Pianisten David Helfgott. Einzigartig unter Seinesgleichen war Peter Feuchtwangers bescheidenes und unprätentiöses Auftreten in der Öffentlichkeit. Gut erinnere ich mich an unser Erstaunen und Schmunzeln, als Peter Feuchtwanger in Hüde am Dümmersee bei Osnabrück im Jahr 2009 mit zwei alten Plastiktüten von SPAR , prall gefüllt mit zerknitterten Notenausgaben stand. Für seine Schüler scheute er nicht die größte Anstrengung, oft arbeitete er an Kurstagen vierzehn Stunden bis zur völligen Erschöpfung mit seinen Schülern: Ohne diese jemals mit einem Wort unter Druck zu setzen. Beschimpfungen oder missbilligende Äußerung gab es bei ihm : NIE. Es machte ihn glücklich, sein Wissen an eine riesige Schülerschar weiter zu geben und dann wie eien Saat aufgehen zu sehen. Einmal ließ er über seine Schüler die Bemerkung fallen : “Alles meine Kinder!” Und wie ein Vater oder Großvater nahm er sich wirklich allen ihm Näher stehenden Schülerinnen und Schülern an. Er machte sich ehrlich Sorgen, wenn es einmal nicht so gut lief, freute sich umso mehr , wenn sich Erfolge und Glück einstellten. Dabei war er wie schon angedeutet nie ein Mann großer Worte. Hochgebildet und belesen, fähig dazu acht sprechen zu sprechen (darunter arabisch und hebräisch) sowie durch seine Familie zutiefst in der deutschen Hochkultur verwurzelt: Ein entfernter Onkel von ihm war der Schriftsteller Lion Feuchtwanger, er selbst noch mit Thomas Mann (Besuch 1952 in Kilchberg) und Hermann Hesse (Wanderung im Tessin) und Erich Kästner persönlich vertraut. Wenn er anfing, Anekdoten aus seinem überaus reichen und bewegten Leben zum Besten zu geben, kam man oft aus dem Staunen nicht mehr heraus: Arthur Rubinstein, den er im Paris der Sechziger Jahre oft besuchte kam genauso vor wie seine Begegnung mit dem Klavier- Zauberer Vladimir Horowitz , den er einmal in New York besuchte . Fasziniert und faszinierend demonstrierte er des Öfteren, wie Horowitz ihm auf dem Boden sitzend in das Geheimnis, wie farbige Akkorde zu spielen seien, eingeweiht hatte. Peter Feuchtwangers Erfahrungsschatz war schier riesig und grenzte ans Unendliche. Bis zuletzt war es seine Leidenschaft, sein Wissen an so viele Schüler wie möglich weiterzugeben, das allerdings niemals wie ein dominanter Guru und schon gar nicht wie ein “Musikdiktator”. Bis vor wenigen Tagen konnte man sich noch direkt von dem großen Musikmeister in South Kensington, beraten zu lassen. Nun ist Peter Feuchtwanger in hohem Alter zu Hause gestorben, allerdings leider ohne sein Wunsch-Lebensalter von über hundert Jahren erreichen zu können . In seinen Schülern, die ihn sehr vermissen, lebt er vielfach weiter. Unser Migefühl gilt allen,die ihm Nahe standen, insbesondere dem australischen Maler Michael Garardy, der Peter Feuchtwanger gerade in den letzten Jahren als “life companion”eine unschätzbare Stütze war. Danke lieber Peter Feuchtwanger, der Mut und die Menschlichkeit Ihres gelebten Lebens werden vielen Menschen Vorbild sein! Leonard Bergman

George Frideric Handel
(1685 – 1759)

George Frideric Handel (23 February 1685 - 14 April 1759) was a German-British Baroque composer, famous for his operas, oratorios, and concertos. Handel was born in Germany in the same year as Johann Sebastian Bach and Domenico Scarlatti. Handel received critical musical training in Italy before settling in London and becoming a naturalised British subject. His works include Messiah, Water Music, and Music for the Royal Fireworks. He was strongly influenced by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition. Handel's music was well-known to composers including Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven.



[+] More news (George Frideric Handel)
Jun 29
Classical iconoclast
Jun 28
Meeting in Music
Jun 27
Topix - Opera
Jun 26
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 23
Classical iconoclast
Jun 23
The Well-Tempered...
Jun 23
Classical iconoclast
Jun 22
All the conductin...
Jun 21
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jun 21
The Boston Musica...
Jun 20
The Boston Musica...
Jun 19
Guardian
Jun 17
Topix - Classical...
Jun 17
parterre box
Jun 16
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 15
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 15
Tribuna musical
Jun 14
Topix - Opera
Jun 14
Royal Opera House
Jun 13
Royal Opera House

George Frideric Handel




Handel on the web...

Handel by Nicholas McGegan

 Interview [EN]

 

Handel by Nicholas McGegan



George Frideric Handel »

Great composers of classical music

Messiah Water Music Opera Oratorios

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...